Police beat: A man with magic eyes, a driverless truck and a door-kicking puzzle – The News Tribune

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by BigJim Jenness

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Editor’s note: Compiled from reports to Tacoma police.

Oct. 6: The man claimed to be a cop, but he wasn’t. He also said he could see through everyone’s eyes. He carried a gun.

The dispatch call reported shots fired near South 13th and I streets. Reportedly, the shooter was standing in the middle of the road. Officers drove to the scene and saw the man, as well as a silver handgun on the ground, surrounded by spent shell casings.

The man, 30, said a group of men shot at him from a silver car, so he pulled his own gun and fired a few rounds into the air. He said he had a concealed weapons permit, and the men in the car had killed his brother, and that was why he carried the gun.

Officers spoke to a witness, a homeless woman who said she camped on a nearby porch. She said she saw the man earlier, walking toward her in silence and pointing the gun at her face.

Officers spoke to a witness, a homeless woman who said she camped on a nearby porch. She said she saw the man earlier, walking toward her in silence and pointing the gun at her face.

The woman said she tried to calm the man and invited him to sit with her. She said the man spoke of his dead brother and the gangsters who tried to kill him. The man walked away after that, she said.

She saw the silver car approach, she said, and heard someone yell at the man to put his gun away. The man fired shots in the air after that, she said.

The scene was confusing; officers spoke to another witness who hadn’t seen a silver car.

One officer told the man he was under arrest for pointing the gun at the woman.

The man denied it and demanded a lawyer. Officers took him to the Pierce County Jail.

During booking, the man raved.

“I rebuke you, devil, in the name of the Lord,” he said, adding, “all the gang members need to die and all the drug addicts.” He said he was a police officer and could see through everyone’s eyes. He was booked on suspicion of reckless endangerment and threats with a weapon.

Oct. 6: The red truck, a 2005 Ford F350, burned out of the convenience store parking lot at 2 a.m. The officer watched it roar and swerve into the 1000 block of South 38th Street, and flicked on his emergency lights.

The short chase ended in another grocery store parking lot nearby. The officer walked toward the truck. The left rear passenger door opened and closed. No one got out.

Three men were inside, all the same age: 23. They sat in the passenger seats. No one was behind the wheel.

Where was the driver, the officer asked.

One man, slightly bigger than the others, said the driver ran away.

The officer knew that was a lie. He’d tracked the truck from the moment it peeled out of the convenience store and never lost sight of it. No one had exited.

One man, slightly bigger than the others, said the driver ran away.

The officer knew that was a lie. He’d tracked the truck from the moment it peeled out of the convenience store and never lost sight of it. No one had exited.

Empty bottles, beer and liquor, were scattered throughout the truck, along with a pair of coolers. An open beer, half-full, sat in the middle console, on the driver’s side. A set of keys and a wallet with one man’s name sat in the driver’s seat.

The officer spoke to one of the men sitting in back, who said he had been only a passenger, that he had prior DUI offenses and would never drive drunk again. Reluctant to talk at first, the man finally said the guy with the wallet had been driving.

The guy with the wallet, eyes bleary and bloodshot, said he hadn’t been driving; a random stranger picked him up with the truck.

The officer looked at the registration. The last name matched the guy with the wallet, who refused to take field sobriety tests and called the officer a few names. The officer told him he was under arrest.

The second man, who had mentioned a runaway driver, was told he was under arrest for obstructing. He replied the officer was biased against Russians. Both men were booked into the Pierce County Jail. The third was released. The truck was towed.

Oct. 4: As domestic tangles go, the door-kicking incident was complicated.

The dispatch call reported a verbal confrontation at an apartment complex in the 600 block of North L Street. An officer drove to the scene and found a woman, 35, arguing at an apartment door with another woman, 42.

The door was messed up, splintered and cracked in the frame. The younger woman said she didn’t do it. The older woman, who lived in the apartment, said the opposite.

The older woman said the trouble started with an argument while the door was closed. The younger woman’s husband had been inside the apartment with the older woman.

The older woman said the trouble started with an argument while the door was closed. The younger woman’s husband had been inside the apartment with the older woman.

The younger woman had yelled. Blows to the door had followed. The older woman admitted she couldn’t see who was pounding the door, but the younger woman was the only person outside.

The older woman explained that the man had called earlier in the day, asking her to pick him up, along with the younger woman’s child. The older woman had agreed and stopped by her apartment on the way back.

That was when the younger woman arrived at the apartment and confronted her husband. The older woman had taken the child into the apartment to let the couple argue alone, she said.

The fight continued in the hall, and the man came into the apartment to pick up his things. That was when the door-pounding started.

The husband and the child were gone. The officer made a judgment call. The intertwining relationships were tough to unravel, but a door was damaged, a child had been present during the altercation, and the older woman had called police because she was afraid.

The officer booked the younger woman into the Pierce County Jail on suspicion of malicious mischief.